Lexus V8 Engine 4.0 Litre 1UZ-FE LS400

Lexus V8 Engine 4.0 Litre 1UZ-FE LS400

We have sold hundreds of these engines pre-wired and running on standard engine management systems. These have been used in all LDV’s and buses like the sprinters and other taxi’s. We regrettably do not sell these units any longer as they are out dated and there are far better options available in this industry that will reward our customers better.

The Lexus V8 Engine 4.0 Litre 1UZ-FE LS400 (3,968 cc or 242.1 cu in) is an all-alloy engine debuted in 1989. It was placed in the first generation Toyota Celsior and the LS400 Lexus. From then on it was progressively released across a lot of models in the Toyota range of vehicles. This is the most cost effective engine we sell in the V8 range. It is older in technology but not to say its a bad engine. This was the original motor that lead Lexus to where they are today and made a name for themselves throughout the world with V8’s. The 1UZ-FE motor runs a 90 Degree V8 and is oversquare by design. It has a bore size of 87.5 mm (3.44 in) and stroke of 82.5 mm (3.25 in). It has been spoken about as bomb proof as it is extremely tough. This makes it a reliable and smooth powerplant with features such as 6-bolt main bearings caps and a belt-driven quad-camshaft system. Only the crankshaft, Con rods or connecting rods and camshafts are made from steel. The cam belt also drives the water pump. The pistons are hypereutectic, and the oil pump is directly driven by the crankshaft. Its resemblance to a race engine platform (6 bolt cross mains and over square configuration) was confirmed in 2007 by David Currier (in an interview with v-eight.com), vice president of TRD USA, stating that the 1UZ platform was based on CART/IRL engine design. It was planned to be used on GT500 vehicles, however its subsequent use in the Daytona Prototype use was not planned. In its standard, original trim with 10:1 compression, power output is 191 kW (256 hp), torque of 353 N·m (260 lb·ft). 1UZ-FE The engine was slightly revised in 1995 with lighter connecting rods and pistons and an increased compression ratio to 10.4:1 resulting in peak power of 195 kW (261 hp) and torque of 363 N·m (268 lb·ft).

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